Poet. Prof. Life.: Allan Aquino

By Romeo Oscar Cascolan
FROM: 700 Magazine

img-0038-4x3_3The inclusive mindset of the American dream makes the United States a welcoming destination for the variety of cultures that the world has to offer. As a Filipino who immigrated to the United States in 2000 and earned my American citizenship in 2018, I can personally attest to the opportunity within this country; as a result, I am more aware of the struggles and hardships that people endure in the hopes of leading a better life in the United States. The field of ethnic studies focuses on understanding the undeniable impact that these immigrants make on this country. The people involved in these studies may come from vastly different backgrounds, but their goal is always the same: to build upon the principles of freedom and independence that unite all Americans.

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Literary History: Kate Braverman, Whose Poetry and Prose Captured a Dark Los Angeles, Dies in Santa Fe, N.M.

By Dorany Pineda
From: Los Angeles Times

download.jpeg-2Kate Braverman a poet, novelist and short-story writer whose work was fueled by a sprawling Los Angeles, has died. She was 70.

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South Central L.A. Poet, Nikolai Garcia, Releases His Debut Chapbook

By Brian Dunlap

FB_IMG_1569901531792The crowd filled in late. Half way through his reading Nikolai Garcia paused to give shout-outs to friends he just noticed had arrived. To friends that he’d known for years. It was his release party for his debut chapbook “Nuclear Shadows of Palm Trees,” from L.A. literary nonprofit DSTL Arts. A collection that captures L.A. away from all the common tropes and streotypes the city is famous for. It’s his L.A.

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Star Chasing by Thomas R. Thomas

By Brian Dunlap

Star-Chasing-Facebook-Feature-1-1020x576The latest release from local L.A. press Los Nietos is Long Beach poet Thomas R. Thomas’ collection Star Chasing. The collection explores the themes of childhood, marriage, death and the gods of America that Donna Hilbert blurbs “chronicles [life] in tract-house Southern California.” These poems, as author Scott Noon Creley notes, are written with “minimalist lines.”

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Good Reads Review of Ablution by Ingrid Calderon-Collins

By Kayla King
FROM: Good Reads

43603758._UX75_Reading Ingrid M. Calderon-Collins’ Ablution, takes readers through the early days of love and beyond. Time passes, as it must. The narrative built within these poems, traverses the relationship between these lovers with a close lens, many titled with just a month and year. It feels too intimate at times, and readers might be compelled to look away, but that’s only a sign to keep reading.

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Passing Of A Los Ángeles Poet Holly Prado

By Brian Dunlap

IMG_7437-Version-2-531x350I learned yesterday that Los Angeles poet Holly Prado died last week at age 81. I never met her, and the only poems of hers that I’ve read were those included in the L.A. poetry anthology Wide Awake, but of course I knew of her. In the course of compiling my webite’s list of weekly events I’d notice her name, usually as part of a reading at Beyond Baroque. She was one of the old guard and began publishing poems in the early 1970s. In compiling my list of local literary presses for Los Angeles I stumbled upon the press/publishing cooperative she co-founded with her husband, the poet and actor Harry Northrup in 1990.

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