FROM OUR LAND TO OUR LAND

By Kirkus Review
FROM: Kirkus Review

9781609809720A distinguished Mexican American writer meditates on the place of Xicanx culture in what he sees as a sick and increasingly fragmented global society.

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Poet. Prof. Life.: Allan Aquino

By Romeo Oscar Cascolan
FROM: 700 Magazine

img-0038-4x3_3The inclusive mindset of the American dream makes the United States a welcoming destination for the variety of cultures that the world has to offer. As a Filipino who immigrated to the United States in 2000 and earned my American citizenship in 2018, I can personally attest to the opportunity within this country; as a result, I am more aware of the struggles and hardships that people endure in the hopes of leading a better life in the United States. The field of ethnic studies focuses on understanding the undeniable impact that these immigrants make on this country. The people involved in these studies may come from vastly different backgrounds, but their goal is always the same: to build upon the principles of freedom and independence that unite all Americans.

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LMU’S SHONDA BUCHANAN TELLS TRUER TALES OF AMERICAN HISTORY

By Carolyn Neuhausen
FROM: The Argonaut

coverLoyola Marymount University writing instructor and rhetorical arts fellow Shonda Buchanan understands how abuse and self-hatred — the kind that ripples through families for generations — can set the tone for interpersonal relationships for decades, if not centuries.

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Locs in the Sweat Lodge: On Shonda Buchanan’s “Black Indian”

By Eisa Nefertari Ulen
FROM: LARB

downloadAward-winning poet Shonda Buchanan honors multiple literary traditions in her breathtaking new memoir, Black Indian. An educator, freelance writer, and literary editor, Buchanan is a culture worker with deep, decades-long engagement in communities of color. Her work honors the complexity and diversity of these Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities. At once Indigenous, Black Female, Speculative, Feminist, Womanist, Urban, Southern Gothic, and counter to the Tragic Mulatto stereotype in American literature, stage, and film, Black Indian is a quintessentially American narrative.

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