Los Ángeles Writers Publish in 2017

By Brian Dunlap

41BsE5LdhBL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_As 2017 draws to a close, the news in the Los Ángeles literary community is one of accomplishment. As the months went by, writers published novels, short story collections, and collections of poetry or announced their books had been accepted for publication next year/2019. Congratulations goes out to all these scribes in penning important works. Some of these books, such as Vickie Vértiz’s Palm Frond With Its Throat Cut, which explores and captures often ignored Southeast Los Angeles where she’s from, and Cynthia Guardado’s debut poetry collection Endever, about survival and specifically the survival of women of color and women of color in Los Angeles, tackle themes and ideas of social justice. How the political is personal.

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Janet Fitch explains what it took to go back to Russia 100 years ago in ‘The Revolution of Marina M.’

By Janet Fitch

From: The Los Angeles Times

THODAAZUKFCZXDXUELOYIIIZOQMy new novel debuts on the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, which is also the historical moment of the book. It didn’t take me quite 100 years to write “The Revolution of Marina M.,” but 11 years was long enough.

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The Secret to Viet Thanh Nguyen’s Overnight Success

The novelist seemed to go from unknown to MacArthur genius in two years. In truth, it took decades.

by Joe Fassler

From: Electric Literature

1-SyURWoGLK1aTh_I3UVw8uAThis month, the novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen was awarded one of the most prestigious honors a writer can receive: the MacArthur “genius” grant, given to artists, thinkers, and public intellectuals whose ideas have culture-altering potential. This, in itself, should surprise no one. Nguyen writes with arresting moral and intellectual force, often about people scarred and uprooted by conflict. As the MacArthur Foundation put it in its citation, Nguyen’s demonstrated a unique gift for exploring how depictions of the Vietnam War “often fail to capture the full humanity and inhumanity, the sacrifices and savagery, of participants on opposing sides.”

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How L.A. Writer Ben Loory Came to Write His Odd, Beloved Fables

by Agatha French

From: Los Angeles Times

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There was a time when Ben Loory lived at night.

That’s how he puts it, as if night isn’t a stretch of empty hours to endure, but a place to enter, to discover whole worlds inside. After dark, the grocery stores are empty and the streets are quiet and still. The city at night is a city through the looking glass, perfect for writing, as Loory does, short stories so imaginative — and yet so perplexingly familiar — they could have formed in a dream.

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