Cyclical Time, Slaughter, and Colonial Violence in Sesshu Foster’s Atomik Aztex

by Maia Gil’Adí

From: American Horror Stories Site

51k44v73w7l-_sx258_bo1204203200_I assigned Sesshu Foster’s Atomik Aztex (2005) as an incentive to begin work on the fourth chapter on my dissertation. In all honesty, I was using my students and our in-class discussions as a sounding board for my own ideas about this complicated novel. Unlike other readings this semester (besides Beloved, perhaps), Atomik Aztex is particularly difficult. It is formally and thematically challenging, implementing postmodern stylistics in conjunction with surrealism, Gonzo “journalism,” and the satirical, which can be baffling for readers.  Foster’s mixing of the “low-brow” and “high-art,” popular and consumer culture, Anglo-American and indigenous cultures also present a challenge for readers. My own interest in this book emerges from Foster’s “performance” of Chicanx in this novel and the possibilities that emerge from reading intra-ethnically and across racial and national boundaries.

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Los Angeles Literature Events 3/13/18 –3/18/18

Artist Talk at Otis College of Art and Design

downloadPlease join us for a conversation with graphic designer and editor Benedikt Reichenbach, to discuss his thoughts and work as a book designer. He is now working on an English re-edition of Pier Polo Pasolini: Corpi e Luoghi, a book that today is still what a critic called it at the time of its publication in 1981, the most Paolininan book to date.

Where: The Forum, Otis College of Art and Design

Date: Tuesday the 13th

Time: 11 am – 12:15 pm

Address: 9045 Lincoln Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90045

Websitehttp://www.otis.edu/calendar/visiting-artist-lecture-benedikt-reichenbach

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Application Period Open For Jack Jones Literary Arts’ Second Annual Writing Retreat

From: Jack Jones Literary Arts

downloadJack Jones Literary Arts, located in Los Ángeles, is hosting its second annual writing retreat at Blue Sky Retreat, Taos, New Mexico. This two-week retreat will be held October 13- 27, 2018, and is open exclusively to women of color. Jenna Wortham joins us as our 2018 Writer-in-Residence.

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PROFILE OF A MODERN-DAY POET IN L.A.: MIKE THE POET

by ASTRID
From: L.A. Taco

IMG_9023“Los Angeles is not Baywatch or the Beach Boys, it is getting carne asada tacos from a taco truck and bacon wrapped hot dogs at two in the morning.”

These are the words of Mike Sonksen, a poet, historian, activist, teacher, husband, and father better known as Mike the Poet. The nickname was given to Mike at the age of 23, by a friend who noticed he always carried a notebook. “You know Mike, you’re not Mike Sonksen, you’re Mike the Poet.”

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Los Angeles Literature Events 3/05/18 –3/11/18

Evening Book Club & How to Stop Time at Pages Bookstore

downloadPlease join us for our Evening Book Club Discussion of How to Stop Time, by Matt Haig. Tom Hazard has a dangerous secret. He may look like an ordinary 41-year-old, but owing to a rare condition, he’s been alive for centuries. He has lived history, with many famous people, but now he just wants an ordinary life. This book tells a love story across the ages, about a man lost in time who ties to find himself and try to find happiness.

Where: Pages Bookstore

Date: Monday the 5th

Time: 7 pm

Address: 904 Manhattan Ave., Manhattan Beach, CA 90266

Website: http://www.pagesabookstore.com/event/evening-book-club-discussion

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XOCHITL-JULISA BERMEJO READS “ANTÍGONA GONZÁLEZ” BY SARA URIBE

From: THE SUNDRESS BLOG

Antigona_FrontCover_GalleryAnna: Can you tell me a little bit about Antígona González?

Xochitl: Antígona González is a book of poetry from Mexican poet Sara Uribe and translated by John Pluecher that uses the classic Greek tragedy, Antigone by Sophocles, as a container to speak about the disappeared of Mexico. In the classic, Antigone is a princess that breaks her uncle’s edict in order to bury her brother Polynices after he has been declared a traitor and his dead body abandoned in the desert. In Antígona González, “Polynices is identified with the marginalized and disappeared,” while Antígona represents the sisters searching for their disappeared brothers: “I didn’t want to be Antigone / but it happened to me.”

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