Daniel A. Olivas: Our Stories Are Important

Daniel A. Olivas: Our Stories Are Important

FROM: Roanoke Review

Daniel A. Olivas is the author of nine books and editor of two anthologies. His latest books are The King of Lighting Fixtures: Stories (University of Arizona Press, 2017) and Crossing the Border: Collected Poems (Pact Press, 2017). Widely anthologized, Olivas has written for many publications, including the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Review of Books, The Guardian, and BOMB. His writing has appeared in many literary journals, including PANK, Fairy Tale Review, MacGuffin, New Madrid, and The Prairie Schooner Blog. He shares blogging duties at La Bloga, which is dedicated to Chicanx and Latinx literature.

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Bradbury Noir: The Crimes of a Science Fiction Master

Bradbury Noir: The Crimes of a Science Fiction Master

By Cullen Gallagher
From: L.A. Review of Books

THE SKELETONS IN Ray Bradbury’s closet are out in Killer, Come Back to Me, a career-spanning collection of the science fictioneer’s crime stories. These 300 pages present a new side to readers who only know Bradbury from such classics as The Martian Chronicles (1950) and Fahrenheit 451 (1953). Published by Hard Case Crime on the occasion of the author’s centennial, the selections were picked by Hard Case head honcho Charles Ardai, Michael Congdon (Bradbury’s longtime agent), and Jonathan R. Eller (director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University and author of, among other titles, Becoming Ray Bradbury, Ray Bradbury Unbound, and Bradbury Beyond Apollo). Encompassing everything from the early pulp work on which he cut his teeth to a story published two years before his death in 2012, Killer, Come Back to Me offers the full spectrum of Bradbury’s criminal imagination.

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News From the L.Á. Literary Community

News From the L.Á. Literary Community

By Brian Dunlap

FlowerSong Press is quietly building an impressive roster of writers. Last December, they published L.Á. poet, Matt Sedillo’s poetry collection Mowing Leaves of Grass, about the history, struggle, tragedy, anger, joy, despair, possibility and faith in the struggles of Chicanx’s, and working class people in general, to overcome the forces of capitalism and racism. Earlier this year they published The Most Spectacular Mistake by Orange County native Anatalia Vallez. Her debut collection is a love story to herself, her roots, and the sacred ritual of chanting the past to heal into the present. Since then, other L.Á. poets such as Angelina Sáenz, Luvette Resto, Iris de Anda, Peter J. Harris, and Matt Sedillo, have announced their next books will be published by FlowerSong in the upcoming year.

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Why So Many Readers Are Turning to Octavia Butler’s Apocalypse Fiction Right Now

Why So Many Readers Are Turning to Octavia Butler’s Apocalypse Fiction Right Now

By Rebecca Onion
FROM: Slate

Earlier this month, Octavia Butler’s novel Parable of the Sower made it onto the New York Times’ bestseller lists 27 years after its original publication. The book, one of two in a planned trilogy that was never completed, follows Lauren Oya Olamina, a Black teenager who lives in an environmentally decayed and socially chaotic California in the 2020s—at the time, still a distant, futuristic decade. In Parable of the Sower and Butler’s 1998 follow-up, Parable of the Talents, Olamina leaves the gated compound where she grew up, goes on the road, starts (and loses) her own community, and becomes a leader of people, spreading a set of ideas she calls “Earthseed.”

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Los Angeles Literature Events 7/20/20 – 7/26/20

Los Angeles Literature Events 7/20/20 – 7/26/20

Most Events Are Online/Virtual DUE TO CORONAVIRUS CONCERNS

101824415_2938018659584926_7961281379935715328_oDig Deep: Virtual Storytime via South Pasadena Library Online – Kids Event

Join us as Children’s Librarians read stories, share finger-plays, songs and flannel-board stories. Each week this event will be available for viewing from Monday through Thursday of that week. For more information about the Summer Reading Program, visit the library website.

Where: South Pasadena Library Online (see event site)

Date: Monday the 20th

Time: 10:30 am – 11 am

Address: Online event

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/697708884358392/

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The Novel That Shows Us How to Face Our Past to Change Our Future

Lessons for current activists and allies from Nina Revoyr’s 2003 literary crime novel “Southland”

By Vallarie Wallace
FROM: Electrict Literature

3788114656_0ada14285f_k-e1591824424154After several grueling hours of protesting against systemic injustice (no one can prepare you for long hours on your feet, long hours screaming for recognition of your humanity), we stood with our signs tucked safely under our arms as the organizer introduced some parting words. The speaker was an older Black man, the weariness of the movement evident in his face and in the way he leaned against a streetlamp for support. But his passion was clear in his speech as he declared that we were not the first to fight for our rights, and we will not be the last: he was protesting in the streets back in his early adulthood, the same way we were today. It was then that I looked at the faces of the people around me; some couldn’t be older than sixteen, and some as old as the speaker, or older. It was in the aftermath of being surrounded by these people, all aligned in our goal for the abolishment of the systemic injustices that cause Black oppression, that Nina Revoyr’s literary crime novel Southland came to mind.

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The Need For Racial Equality Hits the L.Á. Literary Community

By Brian Dunlap

20200615_194431The United States is now in the midst of its strongest push for racial equality since the Civil Rights era. Civil unity and protests sprung up instantly after George Floyd’s death at the hands of police last month in Minneapolis. The calls for police reform have been loud and wide, including calls for justice for Breonna Taylor who was killed by Louisville police as she slept.

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Recommended Los Ángeles Literature For Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

By Brian Dunlap

apahm-logoFor Asain/Pacific American Heritage Month, Los Āngeles Literature is recommending books about Asian L.Á. written by Asians and books written by Asian Angeleños. This history of the city’s Asian American literature extends at least as far back as the 1920s, as historian Valerie J. Matsumoto chronicles in the chapter “Sounding the Dawn Bell: Developing Nisei Voices” from her book City Girls. Continue reading “Recommended Los Ángeles Literature For Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month”