Los Ángeles Writers Publish in 2018

by Brian Dunlap

41R0p7VEIAL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_As 2018 draws to a close, it’s been another year of publishing success for Los Ángeles writers and the Los Angeles literary community. As the months went by, writers published novels, essay collections, poetry collections, edited anthologies or announced their books had been accepted for publication in 2019 and even 2020. Congratulations to all these scribes and for penning important works. Some of these books, such as Erica Ayón’s Orange Lady, which recounts the author’s experience as an immigrant growing up in South Central Los Angeles, where her family sold oranges on the street in order to survive, and Lynell George’s essay collection After/Image: Los Angeles Outside the Frame, focused on Los Angeles beneath-the-surface, both the past and the here-and-now, explores who and what L.A. is from different personal lived experiences. Showing how the political is personal.

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CEMENTING HER REPUTATION

Naomi Hirahara joins an exclusive club — Vroman’s Walk of Fame.
By J.K. Yamamoto
From: Rafu Shimpo

naomi-handsPASADENA — The atmosphere in front of Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena last Saturday afternoon was reminiscent of a Hollywood paparazzi fest.

With dozens of well-wishers taking photos and videos, local mystery author Naomi Hirahara placed her hands in cement and signed her name to become a part of Vroman’s Walk of Fame.

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Los Angeles Literature Events 11/19/18 –11/25/18

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAuthor Program: Cleo & Cornelius at Eagle Rock Branch Library, LAPL – Kids Event

Meet Cleo, Cornelius and two of their creators, Elizabeth Nicholson and Janine Pibal. Children and their families will follow along with courageous Cleo and “couch slouch” Cornelius from the children’s book, Cleo and Cornelius: A Tale of Two Cities and Two Kitties. The book is published on the occasion of the exhibition, Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World at the Getty Center.

Where: Eagle Rock Branch Library, LAPL

Date: Monday the 19th

Time: 4 pm – 5 pm

Address: 5027 Caspar Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90041

Website: http://www.lapl.org/whats-on/events/cleo-and-cornelius-library

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Jack Jones Founder Named to The Root 100 2018

by Brian Dunlap

la-ca-jc-kima-jones-20180102Last week Kima Jones, founder of L.A. based Jack Jones Literary Arts, was named to The Root 100 2018. Coming in at number 88, The Root says Jones made the list because her book-publicist firm consists of a roster “primarily…[of] women and writers of color.”

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REVIEW: BARBIE CHANG BY VICTORIA CHANG

by Kitty Anarchy
From: Los Angeles Review

71rXad9D74L-123x185Victoria Chang’s poetry collection Barbie Chang looks at the complex realities of racism for third-generation children. Even as a child, the speaker, Barbie Chang, is not able to have normal friendships with anyone—she overhears a classmate’s mother advising her daughter against forging a friendship with her because it is not in her best interest in “Barbie Chang’s Daughter:” “the new girl’s / mom tells Barbie Chang / that her own daughter should not tie / herself down too fast.”

 

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On the Books: Brian Dunlap

by Jefferson Beavers
From: Fresno State MFA Blog

Photo Taken By Scott Dunlap 2When did you attend the Fresno State MFA program, and what genre did you study?

I attended Fresno State from 2010-2013 to study fiction.

What were your first thoughts when you learned that your poetry chapbook, Concrete Paradise, would be published?

Surprise and disbelief, because I’d only sent my manuscript out to four or five publishers in the six months since I began the submissions process. Plus, I thought it was ironic that my first book was a book of poems, considering I always wrote fiction and dreamed of publishing novels, and for most of my life had avoided poetry altogether.

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Naomi Hirahara’s Los Angeles

By Mike Sonksen
From: Los Angeles Review of Books

phpThumb_generated_thumbnailEditor’s note: Naomi Hirahara has been a pillar of the mystery community since she published her first Mas Arai novel in 2004. To commemorate her final Mas novel, I asked Mike Sonksen, a.k.a. Mike the Poet, bard and historian of contemporary Los Angeles, to go on a walk with Naomi and write a profile that would do her justice. It was a huge task, but I believe he succeeded.

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NAOMI HIRAHARA IS one of the most prolific Los Angeles writers of the last few decades. Best known for her Edgar Award–winning seven-book Mas Arai crime novel series, she has also authored several nonfiction titles on Southern California Japanese-American history. Her newest Mas Arai mystery title and the final one of the series, Hiroshima Boy, was just published by Prospect Park Books in March 2018, and in April her latest nonfiction title, Life After Manzanar, was published by Heyday.

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