Los Ángeles Writers Publish in 2018

by Brian Dunlap

41R0p7VEIAL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_As 2018 draws to a close, it’s been another year of publishing success for Los Ángeles writers and the Los Angeles literary community. As the months went by, writers published novels, essay collections, poetry collections, edited anthologies or announced their books had been accepted for publication in 2019 and even 2020. Congratulations to all these scribes and for penning important works. Some of these books, such as Erica Ayón’s Orange Lady, which recounts the author’s experience as an immigrant growing up in South Central Los Angeles, where her family sold oranges on the street in order to survive, and Lynell George’s essay collection After/Image: Los Angeles Outside the Frame, focused on Los Angeles beneath-the-surface, both the past and the here-and-now, explores who and what L.A. is from different personal lived experiences. Showing how the political is personal.

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Accolades for Long Beach Poet Michelle Brittan Rosado

by Brian Dunlap

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Michelle Brittan Rosado is a poet from Vacaville, CA who now lives in Long Beach. Her first full-length collection of poetry Why Can’t It Be Tenderness was published last month by the University of Wisconsin Press. In this collection she explores the themes of coming-of-age, mixed-race identity, diaspora, and cultural inheritance. However, Brittan Rosado has also recently received good news about her next collection of poetry.

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Los Angeles, City of Poets

by Sesshu Foster
FROM: LARB

phpThumb_generated_thumbnailONE DAY, when my brother Paul was 12, he came home wearing a shirt made from the American stars and stripes. My uncle caught him — my uncle owned the East L.A. house we lived in at the time and he reminded us of this fact regularly. He beat Paul to the floor and tore the shirt off. That same year, they put Paul on a Greyhound bus at the old terminal on Sixth and Los Angeles Streets and sent him up to Northern California to live with our dad. After a couple years, Paul was out on his own, moving through a series of hippie communes, Big Sur cabins, and foster homes, where he started reading Allen Ginsberg and the Beats.

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Nancy Lynee Woo is an Incorrigible Optimist and that’s a Good Thing

FROM: Palacio Podcast

BJOIA-picNancy Lynee Woo is a freelance writer, editor, and creative consultant, and organizer of creative events including community writing workshops and poetry series. She is also an incorrigible optimist and is not shy about admitting it and for good reason. (Her middle name is actually “Lynée” but WordPress won’t let me use it in SEO. My apologies.)

“I cannot help but try and see the best in everything and I have to believe that things are getting better.”

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L.A. Poet Announced as New Executive Editor of The Offing

by Brian Dunlap

header_offing_logoEarlier this month, Mimi Wong’s The Offing letter to the editor, she revealed all the new changes happening at the literary journal. This includes her own announcement as the new editor of the literary magazine, which is dedicated “to amplify[ing], [promoting], and support[ing] these voices often missing from mainstream spaces.” However, the change of most note to the Los Ángeles literary community is the hiring of poet Ashaki M. Jackson as The Offing’s new Executive Editor. Jackson is a champion of “women’s and nonbinary writers” as seen “through her endeavors at VIDA and Women Who Submit.”

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The Passing of Larry Colker

by Brian Dunlap

downloadNOTE: Initially I didn’t post anything on Los Angeles Literature about Larry Colker’s passing last month from cancer because I never met him and I didn’t know him as a writer. However, seeing that Beyond Baroque is celebrating his life, the life of an L.A. poet and friend, on Saturday, and the fact that Los Angeles Literature is a news, history and information site covering the Los Angeles literary community, I feel obligated to post a brief article about him.

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Irene Monica Sanchez Wins Poetry Award

By Brian Dunlap

logowithtextLos Ángeles poet Irene Monica Sanchez has won the 2018 Joe Hill Labor Poetry Award.

As stated on the Labor Heritage website the “Joe Hill Award honors leaders and artists who have contributed to the successful integration of arts and culture in the labor movement, given every year at the Great Labor Arts Exchange is awarded to persons based on their dedication, participation, and promotion of labor, labor arts, culture, organizing, and/or history.” Joe Hill Labor Poetry Award

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