Poetic Lenses: Our Fifteenth Annual Look at Debut Poetry

By Dana Isokawa
FROM: Poets & Writers

debut_poets_collageFor our fifteenth annual look at debut poetry, we chose ten poets whose first books struck us with their formal imagination, distinctive language, and deep attention to the world. The books, all published in 2019, inhabit a range of poetic modes. There is Keith S. Wilson’s reimagining of traditional forms in Fieldnotes on Ordinary Love, and Maya Phillips’s modern epic, Erou. There is Maya C. Popa’s lyric investigations in American Faith, Marwa Helal’s subversive documentary poems in Invasive species, and Yanyi’s series of prose poems in The Year of Blue Water. The ten collections clarify and play with all kinds of language—the language of the news, of love, of politics, of philosophy, of family, of place—and, as Popa says, they “slow and suspend the moment, allowing a more nuanced examination of what otherwise flows through us quickly.”

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DEAR DAUGHTERS, DEAR LINDA: ESSAYS FROM ‘TERRIBLE CRYSTALS’

By Victoria Chang
FROM: The Normal School

288896815_9787e7ed0f_cDear Daughter,

Sometimes I wish I didn’t try and fix everything from your childhood. Sometimes I wish I hadn’t tried so hard to help you memorize your math facts when you weren’t ready. Sometimes I wonder how many mistakes I am making now that will become clearer only later.

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Book Review: Let the Buzzards Eat Me Whole

By Scott Neuffer
FROM: Trampset

1_iKgstnPn-oQUEUsnFtNpUQ@2x.jpegMy wife tells me not to talk about it: her trauma. She survived the dirty wars in Peru. If you talk, you die, she tells me. People don’t talk about it. The dead are dead. The living go on. Sorry, it’s not my place, I say. But these ghosts. I can feel them.

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Poet. Prof. Life.: Allan Aquino

By Romeo Oscar Cascolan
FROM: 700 Magazine

img-0038-4x3_3The inclusive mindset of the American dream makes the United States a welcoming destination for the variety of cultures that the world has to offer. As a Filipino who immigrated to the United States in 2000 and earned my American citizenship in 2018, I can personally attest to the opportunity within this country; as a result, I am more aware of the struggles and hardships that people endure in the hopes of leading a better life in the United States. The field of ethnic studies focuses on understanding the undeniable impact that these immigrants make on this country. The people involved in these studies may come from vastly different backgrounds, but their goal is always the same: to build upon the principles of freedom and independence that unite all Americans.

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Episode Six of Poetry Salon’s Poetry Saloncast

By Brian Dunlap

20102_10151304646867936_350037825_nThe Poetry Salon has released the six episode of its Poetry Saloncast. This episode’s interview is with local poet Alexis Rhone Fancher, whose work has been described as blazing and frank and her submissions regimen ambitious. Fancher discusses her work-ethic and her ability to detach herself from her writing, even when writing about very personal subjects.

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Literary History: Kate Braverman, Whose Poetry and Prose Captured a Dark Los Angeles, Dies in Santa Fe, N.M.

By Dorany Pineda
From: Los Angeles Times

download.jpeg-2Kate Braverman a poet, novelist and short-story writer whose work was fueled by a sprawling Los Angeles, has died. She was 70.

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South Central L.A. Poet, Nikolai Garcia, Releases His Debut Chapbook

By Brian Dunlap

FB_IMG_1569901531792The crowd filled in late. Half way through his reading Nikolai Garcia paused to give shout-outs to friends he just noticed had arrived. To friends that he’d known for years. It was his release party for his debut chapbook “Nuclear Shadows of Palm Trees,” from L.A. literary nonprofit DSTL Arts. A collection that captures L.A. away from all the common tropes and streotypes the city is famous for. It’s his L.A.

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