‘I Was Interested In The People Who Are Stuck With These Memories’

Steph Cha discusses her new novel “Your House Will Pay,” the LA Riots, the Korean American Angeleno community, her 3,600 Yelp reviews, and pushing back against gatekeepers in publishing.

By Victoria Namkung
FROM: Longreads

LA Riots 1992On March 16, 1991, 15-year-old Latasha Harlins went to a local convenience store in South Los Angeles to buy a bottle of orange juice. Owner Soon Ja Du accused the teenage girl of shoplifting, an altercation ensued, and in a split-second captured on video, Du shot Harlins in the back of the head. She died with two dollars in her hand. A jury found Du guilty of voluntary manslaughter, but against their recommendation, the judge sentenced the Korean-born woman to a $500 fine, probation, and community service.

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LMU’S SHONDA BUCHANAN TELLS TRUER TALES OF AMERICAN HISTORY

By Carolyn Neuhausen
FROM: The Argonaut

coverLoyola Marymount University writing instructor and rhetorical arts fellow Shonda Buchanan understands how abuse and self-hatred — the kind that ripples through families for generations — can set the tone for interpersonal relationships for decades, if not centuries.

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Episode Six of Poetry Salon’s Poetry Saloncast

By Brian Dunlap

20102_10151304646867936_350037825_nThe Poetry Salon has released the six episode of its Poetry Saloncast. This episode’s interview is with local poet Alexis Rhone Fancher, whose work has been described as blazing and frank and her submissions regimen ambitious. Fancher discusses her work-ethic and her ability to detach herself from her writing, even when writing about very personal subjects.

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Author Interview With Author of Arroyo, Chip Jacobs!

By Denise Alicea
FROM: The Pen & Muse

Arroyo-Hardcover-2DSet against two distinct epochs in the history of Pasadena, California, Arroyo tells the parallel stories of a young man and his dog in 1913 and 1993. In both lives, they are drawn to the landmark Colorado Street Bridge, or “Suicide Bridge,” as the locals call it, which suffered a lethal collapse during construction but still opened to fanfare in the early twentieth century automobile age. When the refurbished structure commemorates its 80th birthday, one of the planet’s best known small towns is virtually unrecognizable from its romanticized, and somewhat invented, past.

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David Ulin on the Rapidly Changing Landscape of Los Angeles

The Former LA Times Book Critic in Conversation with Paul Holdengraber

By Lit Hub
FROM: Lit Hub

los-angeles-echo-parkIn this episode of A Phone Call With Paul, Paul Holdengraber speaks with David Ulin, writer, and former book critic of the Los Angeles Times, about the dramatic changes in Los Angeles, the literature of the city, and his work on Joan Didion.

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2 Local Poets: ‘The Spirit of Activism Has Always Been in LA Poetry’

By Steve Chiotakis
FROM: Greater L.A./KCRW

Southern California may not get the credit it deserves for its strong literary community and a great spoken word scene. However, poets Shonda Buchanan and Mike Sonksen tell Greater LA the poetry community could be the most diverse scene in the city of Los Angeles.

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