Behind The Editor’s Desk: Vanessa Angélica Villarreal

by Women Who Submit

From: Women Who Submit

GLP_Header2222Vanessa Angélica Villarreal just signed on as nonfiction editor at LA’s own Gold Line Press. She’s an innovative poet who isn’t constrained by genre; her work is electrifying, form-melting, challenging.  I asked her about Gold Line’s upcoming chapbook contest and her work as an editor.

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Develop Skills and Transcend Limits through the Arts: Meet Luis Antonio Pichardo

by Catherine Sturgeon

From: LAPL Blog

blog-post-cover-dtla-artsDSTL Arts is a nonprofit arts mentorship organization based in Los Angeles that “inspires, teaches, and hires emerging artists from underserved communities.” The acronym in DSTL Arts stands for Develop Skills and Transcend Limits through the Arts. Co-founded by Luis Antonio Pichardo and Jennifer Fuentes in late 2012, DSTL Arts began as Luis’ vision for empowering the next generation of working artists from underserved and underrepresented communities in the arts, serving, at first, only youth whom aspired to become working artists in spite of a lack of a support system in their immediate community, including their families.

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MICRO-INTERVIEW: LA POET EMILY FERNANDEZ

by K.E. OGDEN

From: Kenyon Review Online

FERNANDEZ-EMILY-WEB-300x300This is the fifth interview in an ongoing series about the intersections of writing, teaching, and identity. Read Past Interviews in the series: Kathy Kottaras, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Mike Rose, Virginia Pye.

Emily Fernandez has lived in California almost every year of her life, except for a three-year tour in New York, where she graduated from NYU with an M.A. in English literature. She lives in Los Angeles and teaches at Pasadena City College where she runs the Visiting Writers series with her colleagues and also organizes the annual Pasadena City College Poetry Day celebration each April. Her new chapbook, Procession of Martyrs, was just released by Finishing Line Press. She is a proud member of the LA womyn’s writing group Las Lunas Locas. Her poems have been featured at Poetic Diversity and Verse Virtual.

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Artist Interview with Poet Laureate John Brantingham

From: Treehouse Arts

Hanging-RockI first came across John Brantingham’s work when he sent in a poetry submission to TreeHouse Arts, which I quickly accepted (you can view that publication here). Obviously, I liked his work, but what truly caught my attention was that in his bio he mentioned that he spends summers “living off the grid in a tent in the High Sierra, teaching poetry and writing for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park.”

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Cynthia Guardado Interview Podcast with Ever Velasquez and Todd Taylor

From: razorcake.org

cynthia_guardado_takashi_matsumoto_razorcakeCynthia Guardado is a fierce and unapologetically brown Salvadorian American female punk rockera, poeta, activista, y profe straight from Inglewooooood, California. Her poems have been published in PALABRA, A Magazine of Chicano & Latino Literary Art; The Packing House Review; and Razorcake’s very own Puro Pinche Poetry: Gritos Del Barrio.

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Myriam Gurba’s “Mean” Explores Growing Up A Queer “Molack” In California: BUST Interview

by  Bri Kane

From: Bust

meanWhen you read Mean by Myriam Gurba, you’re going to laugh, and cry, at some really gross and mean things – but that’s kinda the whole point. Mean is a very introspective book, exploring Gurba’s childhood, adolescence, and early adult life. By analyzing her own memory, Gurba forces the reader to do the same. She describes the book as a “novel that is memoiristic,” meaning not exactly a memoir, but not exactly fiction — it blends the two genres through memory, analysis, and retrospection.

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The Secret to Viet Thanh Nguyen’s Overnight Success

The novelist seemed to go from unknown to MacArthur genius in two years. In truth, it took decades.

by Joe Fassler

From: Electric Literature

1-SyURWoGLK1aTh_I3UVw8uAThis month, the novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen was awarded one of the most prestigious honors a writer can receive: the MacArthur “genius” grant, given to artists, thinkers, and public intellectuals whose ideas have culture-altering potential. This, in itself, should surprise no one. Nguyen writes with arresting moral and intellectual force, often about people scarred and uprooted by conflict. As the MacArthur Foundation put it in its citation, Nguyen’s demonstrated a unique gift for exploring how depictions of the Vietnam War “often fail to capture the full humanity and inhumanity, the sacrifices and savagery, of participants on opposing sides.”

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