Vanessa Angélica Villarreal Is A Finalist

By Brian Dunlap

vav-blueVanessa Angélica Villarreal is the author of Beast Meridian (Noemi Press, 2017) a poetry collection that confronts and refutes the violence of erasure and assimilation, rooted in the borderlands of her birth. This violence and erasure is a physical space where “the speaker confronts her life in the eternal hallway of the subconscious,” as poet Sara Borjas says in her review of the book. For this confrontation and refutation Villarreal’s poetry collection was named, earlier this month, as a finalist for the 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award, which recognizes the work of a poet of promise with $10,000.

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Los Lobos’ Louie Perez Talks Musical Memoir ‘Good Morning Aztlan’: Exclusive

The band’s founding member reflects on growing up Chicano & being an artist.

by Catalina Maria Johnson
From: Billboard

louie-perez-press-photo-2018-a-billboard-1548About 40 years ago, four musicians in a high school rock band decided to learn the Mexican standard “Las Mañanitas” to regale one of the band member’s moms on her birthday. Daunted by how difficult that proved to be — they had underestimated the complexity of their musical culture — the young East LA born-and-bred Chicanos decided to frame their Mexican roots music in rock ‘n’ roll and R&B grooves. And so, the iconic, multi-Grammy-winning band Los Lobos was born.

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Letters To My City

By Brian Dunlap

mike-sonksen-shot-at-woodbury-200x300Mike Sonsken has been a fixture in the Los Angeles Literary community for two decades. He burst on the scene spitting spoken word verse late into the night, at many venues, events, and open mics, some that no longer exist. During the course of these two decades he’s traveled to Echo Park and Sylmar, Venice and the Eastside, Downtown and Torrance, and everywhere in-between, performing poems laced with the city’s stories and history, hosting open mics and readings, being a tour guide to its streets, teaching students poetry and encouraging them to explore who and what Los Ángeles is.

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Los Ángeles Writers Publish in 2018

by Brian Dunlap

41R0p7VEIAL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_As 2018 draws to a close, it’s been another year of publishing success for Los Ángeles writers and the Los Angeles literary community. As the months went by, writers published novels, essay collections, poetry collections, edited anthologies or announced their books had been accepted for publication in 2019 and even 2020. Congratulations to all these scribes and for penning important works. Some of these books, such as Erica Ayón’s Orange Lady, which recounts the author’s experience as an immigrant growing up in South Central Los Angeles, where her family sold oranges on the street in order to survive, and Lynell George’s essay collection After/Image: Los Angeles Outside the Frame, focused on Los Angeles beneath-the-surface, both the past and the here-and-now, explores who and what L.A. is from different personal lived experiences. Showing how the political is personal.

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Accolades for Long Beach Poet Michelle Brittan Rosado

by Brian Dunlap

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Michelle Brittan Rosado is a poet from Vacaville, CA who now lives in Long Beach. Her first full-length collection of poetry Why Can’t It Be Tenderness was published last month by the University of Wisconsin Press. In this collection she explores the themes of coming-of-age, mixed-race identity, diaspora, and cultural inheritance. However, Brittan Rosado has also recently received good news about her next collection of poetry.

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Jack Jones Founder Named to The Root 100 2018

by Brian Dunlap

la-ca-jc-kima-jones-20180102Last week Kima Jones, founder of L.A. based Jack Jones Literary Arts, was named to The Root 100 2018. Coming in at number 88, The Root says Jones made the list because her book-publicist firm consists of a roster “primarily…[of] women and writers of color.”

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