Poem for a New Dream

In the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub massacre, Orlando, Florida, June 12, 2016Orlando_Skyline.jpg

By Luis J. Rodriguez

From: Los Angeles Public Library Blog

 

Hate becomes death becomes hate.

The world unravels in fear.

 

Columbine: 13 students and a teacher gone.

Sandy Hook: 20 children and 6 adults murdered.

Charleston, North Carolina: 9 black churchgoers killed.

San Bernardino: 14 men and women destroyed.

Orlando, Florida: 50 patrons of a LGBTQ nightclub slaughtered.

Hate that shouts without a voice,

that uses bullets to speak,

that has a finality to its grief,

that can’t see because this rage has no eyes…

 

No brain.

No heart.

No connections.

 

Hate in Wounded Knee, 1890: 300 Native men, women, children wiped out.

 

Ludlow, Colorado, 1914: National Guard and John D. Rockefeller’s company guards

kill some 25 men, women, and children during coal miners’ strike.

 

Tulsa Oklahoma, 1921: Upwards of 300 black residents slaughtered by whites

In 1919 alone, hundreds killed in more than 300 riots against blacks.

 

Some 4,000 blacks lynched from 1860 to 1950,

around 700 Mexicans in roughly the same years.

 

Millions erased bringing Africans to America….

 

In the first 15 years of the 21st century, police killed unarmed black residents in Ferguson, Baltimore, Oakland, New York, Los Angeles…

 

Salinas police killed 5 unarmed Mexican and Salvadoran farmworkers in 2014.

 

Black lives matter because when they stop being killed, we’re all free.

 

Hate against the raped women (1 in 5 women raped in the United States),

killing women’s choices for their bodies, killing and killing and killing.

 

Oklahoma City: 168 blown to pieces.

Twin Towers, New York: 2,752 massacred.

 

6 millions Jews destroyed in the Holocaust.

 

When right becomes hate, it loses its right.

 

When walls are the response

—or invasions, drone attacks, torture, perpetual war…

 

Hate rules.

 

Ask Hitler. Ask Mussolini. Ask Pinochet.

 

Ask the 75,000 killed during the 1980s in El Salvador,

or 100,000 Mayan villagers in Guatemala,

or the hundreds of protesting students in Tlatelolco, Mexico.

Read Rest of Poem Here

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